Untapped Festival Dallas: Flaming Lips, Dr. Dog, Cloud Nothings, Elle King, and more

Untapped Festival Dallas: Flaming Lips, Dr. Dog, Cloud Nothings, Elle King, and more

Saturday, November 7, 2015

2:30 pm

Parade of Flesh

Dallas, TX

$39.00

This event is all ages

Flaming Lips
Flaming Lips
Of the innumerable one-hit wonders littering the cultural landscape, few, if any, were so brave, so frequently brilliant, and so deliciously weird as the Flaming Lips. To even classify the Lips as merely a one-hit wonder is to do the group a grave injustice: although their standing as a commercial entity proved little more than a blip on the radar screen, their moment of Top 40 success was simply another pit-stop on one of the more surreal and haphazard career trajectories in pop music -- an acid-bubblegum band with as much affinity for sweet melodies as blistering noise assaults, their off-kilter sound, uncommon emotional depth, and bizarre history (packed with tales of self-immolating fans and the like) firmly established them as one of the true originals of the post-punk era.
Dr. Dog
Dr. Dog
Live At A Flamingo Hotel marks the first ever bottling of the the Philly band's legendary live show. While their studio records have consistently demonstrated a sense of sonic adventure and truly gifted songwriting, it has always been their rollicking and celebratory concerts that have made DR. DOG one of America's best bands. It has also been key to establishing an ever growing and dedicated fan base.

"That's always what we've wanted to do," says bassist/vocalist Toby Leaman. "We're one thing on a record and a different thing live. Somebody goes to a DR. DOG show and they come back again and they bring more people with them. Our live show is vital to how we view ourselves as a band."

The Wall St. Journal's Speakeasy recently profiled and streamed the new album, writing "None of the venues on the band's 2014 tour was called the Flamingo Hotel, which was the point: for Dr. Dog, the Flamingo Hotel represents a state of mind."

Which is exactly the point. With Live at a Flamingo Hotel, the band has captured the essence of a DR. DOG show; a band that gives its all to each and every audience, every night. "That's the point of a DR. DOG show, transporting you in some way," says Leaman. "Whether it's a shit basement in Texas or an amphitheater in Philadelphia, it doesn't matter, this is the place; this is what we do, no matter what."
Cloud Nothings
Cloud Nothings
Cloud Nothings was founded in a Cleveland basement, the one-man recording project of Dylan Baldi, an unassuming, then 18-year-old student of song with a breathtaking ear for melody. Prolific from the start, Baldi's early work was rough but immediate: crudely recorded, spring-loaded spasms of Buzzcocks-informed pop that quickly found an online following among the lo-fi-inclined. When an opportunity presented itself to open a small show in Brooklyn, Baldi abandoned a still-in-progress final project to be there. The gamble paid off — he's been touring ever since, using every available break to write and record more.

In 2010, Carpark unveiled Turning On, a retrospective introduction that combined early 7″ singles and the full-length debut (a limited release on cassette and vinyl) from which it took its name. The following year, Cloud Nothings made its proper Carpark debut with a thrilling self-titled LP that found Baldi in a studio for the first time, shedding the many layers of hiss and distortion that had once obscured (or enhanced) his every sugary hook. What followed was an unexpected breakthrough, 2012′s Attack on Memory, an album that very loudly (with the help of producer Steve Albini) announced the arrival of Cloud Nothings as the sound of more than just Baldi: Caustic and gargantuan, it marked the first time our young hero wrote with and for his longtime touring band, drummer Jayson Gerycz, bassist TJ Duke and since departed guitarist Joe Boyer. Touring intensified, rock critics slobbered, and the ceiling was raised considerably.

Enter yet another first: the highly-anticipated follow-up. Here and Nowhere Else is the sound of Baldi further realizing his potential not just as a collaborative bandleader but a singer as well. The sometimes frightening interplay that galvanized its predecessor is refined here, Baldi's cyclonic guitar parts and Gerycz's seismic drumwork more tightly clenched and nuanced than they've ever been before. It's an album every bit as ferocious as what we've recently come to expect — only smarter.
Elle King
Elle King
Frank and fearless, tender and rowdy, Elle King's debut album, "LOVE STUFF" marks the true arrival of the young singer/songwriter/guitarist/banjoist as a pop force to be reckoned with. "I always thought I knew who I was," says King, "but now I'm really learning what kind of person I want to be. And with that comes who I am as an artist, because the songs come from who I am and what I go through."

She recorded these twelve songs with such remarkable producers as Jeff Bhasker (Fun., Kanye West), Eg White (Adele, Sam Smith), and Jacknife Lee (R.E.M., U2), and guest musicians including Mark Ronson and Patrick Carney of the Black Keys. The first single from "LOVE STUFF," "Ex's & Oh's," was #1 Most Added at AAA radio upon release; Billboard called the track "catchy and clever."

The album is the follow-up to 2012's acclaimed "The Elle King EP," which was praised by such outlets as Esquire, Vanity Fair, and Entertainment Weekly and included the single "Playing For Keeps," which was featured as the theme song for VH1's "Mob Wives Chicago" and chosen for the national TV ad campaign for "Mad Men." Following the EP's release, King toured extensively with the likes of Ed Sheeran, Train, and Of Monsters and Men, pushing back her work on new music.

"In my mind, I was going to just go make an album a few months later," says King. "I had super-high expectations and was putting so much pressure on myself. But the EP happened so fast -- I never expected how quickly you can get music on TV, I went on 'David Letterman' for the first time, which was insane and incredible and something I'll never forget. And then opportunities kept coming up, so I toured pretty straight for a year, and if I had a few days off, I'd get into the studio with somebody."

Those periodic sessions took her around the world, from London to Malibu, Memphis to New York City. "I have so many influences, I wake up in different moods and want to play different music, and in some wacky way, we tied it all in," says King. "We found the people that got me, that believed in me and wanted to be a part of it -- after we did one song together, they wanted to do another."

Asked what she learned from working with such a wide and accomplished range of producers and musicians, she has an instant answer. "Never shut out an idea -- you always have to try anything, twice! I kept an open mind and then not only got to work with geniuses and get incredible songs, but I also got great role models and friends. And through laughing, jumping for joy, kicking, screaming, I feel like I finally found my sound."

The results, as heard on "LOVE STUFF," display King's grounding in rock, blues, country, and pop styles, and a sweeping emotional road map -- the stomp of "Where the Devil Don't Go," the sexy sweetness of "Make You Smile," the swagger of "America's Sweetheart." She notes "Sweetheart" as a breakthrough, saying that producer/co-writer Martin Johnson (who she calls "an insane pop genius") pushed her harder than any other collaborator. "Faster, higher, louder -- I was singing so hard I had to sit down between takes. That's the fastest I've ever played banjo; I have no idea how I'll do that onstage."

Raised in rural Ohio, King pinpoints the day her life changed to her ninth birthday, when her stepdad refused to get her the album by the pop-reggae star that she wanted and instead gave her the first album by hard-rocker girls the Donnas. "I put that on and that was it," she says. "I wanted to play rock and roll and be a girl and do it. I started listening to the Runaways and Blondie -- all the rad chicks."

She moved to New York City at age 10; after getting kicked out of school, she headed to California, then returned to New York, and then to Philadelphia for art college. In the midst of her far-flung and hell-raising travels, King started playing guitar at age 13 ("a friend of my stepdad's taught me, and I learned stuff by, like, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Otis Redding") and then later picked up a banjo, inspired by the Hank Williams and Earl Scruggs records her family listened to.

It was during her time in Philadelphia that her music took a different turn, and her songwriting got more serious. "I was living on my own, getting into way too much trouble, and really getting my heart broken for the first time," she says. "I've never been shy, but that's when I started singing in parks and busking."

King also had an epiphany about her approach to her instruments. "When I picked up the banjo, I would play country music," she says. "But I saw a band in the park one day, and these guys played the banjo just as an instrument, not stylized in any kind of mold, and I got it -- just play it because it's beautiful."

The songs that started emerging got her noticed and led to the making of "The Elle King EP." But even after relocating to Brooklyn and pursuing a music career in earnest, King was no more able to settle down. "I haven't been able to sit still since I could walk," she says. "I followed a country singer to Nashville, got my heart broken again but decided to stay there and try to figure it out. I took a year to really think, and then left and I haven't stopped -- I drove 30 thousand miles in the first six weeks. But if you can't handle that, you're not gonna make it. I want to put my feet in every country, I just want to go out and play. I'm a gypsy."

With this outlook, she singles out the "LOVE STUFF" track "Song of Sorrow" as an especially personal and meaningful statement; "I can't seem to find my way back home," she sings. "It's been a hundred years/I've no idea which direction to go."

"That's about where I'm from and the journey of finding yourself," says King. "Since I'm constantly moving, home is a state of mind, not a place. I'm always searching for where I feel at home.

"That's why I have such a sense of pride about this album," she continues. "I worked my ass off and kept trying my hardest. I feel unbelievably lucky. I still can't believe I'm getting away with it."
Venue Information:
Parade of Flesh
TBD
Dallas, TX