Earth, King Dude, True Widow

Parade of Flesh presents . . .

Earth

King Dude

True Widow

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

7:30 pm

Club Dada

Dallas, TX

$13.00 - $15.00

This event is all ages

Earth
Earth
Earth's drone-heavy experimentation is largely the result of its one lasting member, guitarist Dylan Carlson. The band was originally formed in 1990 in Olympia, Washington by Carlson, Slim Moon (who later founded the Kill Rock Stars label), and Greg Babior. Moon and Babior left soon after and were replaced by Joe Preston. Earth played a few live shows and then recorded some material with Mike Lastra. After opening for L7 in Seattle, the group was approached by Sub Pop Records, which released the recordings in 1991 as Extra-Capsular Extraction. The following year, Carlson and Preston recorded Earth 2 with producer Stewert Hallerman, but Preston left soon after the album's release.

Sub Pop was unhappy with Earth's lackadaisical recording tendencies, and the label pulled the plug on 1993 sessions for the third album. Recording resumed the following year with producer Ian Dickson (who would become a permanent member just one year later), engineer Scott Benson, and drummer Rick Cambern. Phase 3 was finally released in April 1995. A live album taken from a Blast First label concert was released the same year as Sunn Amps and Smashed Guitars. Sub Pop surprisingly re-signed Earth for three more albums early in 1996, and Carlson recorded a new album, Pentastar: In the Style of Demons. The album showed a more stabilized band, with the addition of guitarist Shawn McElligot and drummer Mike McDaniels. After a small series of live performances following the release, Earth quietly disbanded with virtually no public acknowledgment of the split. A live album appeared in 2000, followed the next year by a series of demos (one which includes another vocal from the deceased Kurt Cobain) issued with a CD version of the Sunn Amps EP. An Earth video titled A Bureaucratic Desire for Revenge was also available from Sub Pop.

Earth returned in 2002 for a series of live shows in the U.S. and Europe, this time as a two-piece with Carlson and drummer Adrienne Davies. That lineup was featured on 2005's Living in the Gleam of an Unsheathed Sword. The album was recorded live, with its title cut lasting nearly an hour. Earth returned that September with the more ambitious Hex: Or Printing in the Infernal Method, which suggested the sound of a drone metal band covering Giant Sand or Scenic. Hibernaculum was released in 2008, which offered four long songs, three of which originally appeared on earlier recordings but were performed on this set via the new Earth sonic aesthetic. It also contained a DVD featuring concert and interview footage from the Hex tour. The Bees Made Honey in the Lion's Skull appeared in 2009, and took the latter-day Earth sound into even more hauntingly abstract and cinematic directions.

In 2010, Southern Lord released A Bureaucratic Desire for Extra-Capsular Extraction, a remastered compilation containing the complete 1990 Smegma Studios sessions -- their earliest recordings -- that were previously only available separately on Extra-Capsular Extraction and Sunn Amps and Smashed Guitars. Carlson resumed the experiments he began back on Hex: Or Printing in the Infernal Method with the first part of a projected trilogy entitled Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light, Vol. 1. It was also issued by Southern Lord in early 2011. Somewhat different in approach, Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light, Vol. 2 was issued by Southern Lord in early 2012.
King Dude
King Dude
Don't let the inappropriate band name fool you. We had visions of dorky noise rock, or maybe fuzzy garage pop goofs, when in fact, King Dude is something much more haunting and enthralling, initially lumped in with the whole witch house scene, due in part to releases on witch house labels like Disaro and Clan Destine, the sound of King Dude, aka TJ Cowgill, who also does time in Book Of Black Earth, is more a dark brooding, neo-folk, think Death In June, Blood Axis, Cult Of Youth, Sol Invictus, urgently strummed guitars, deep dramatic sung/spoken vocals, the vibe haunting and otherworldly, minor key and melancholy, occasionally strident and majestic, but more often moody and mournful, the lyrics full of blood and sky, earth and fire, death and the beyond, a ritualistic doom folk, channeling the seventies British acid folk of groups like Comus and Incredible String Band through the more modern industrial folk sound of the above mentioned groups. Female vocals add dreamy harmonies here and there, but for the most part, this is dark stripped down twang flecked doom/neo folk that should also appeal to fans of Woven Hand, Sixteen Horsepower, Hexvessel, Kiss The Anus Of A Black Cat, Der Blutharsch and the like.
True Widow
True Widow
Over the past two decades, we've been bombarded with grunge, with shoegaze, with sludge, with doom metal, with post-rock, with slow-core, with all these examples of loud rock music that reach towards one extreme or another, the sole intent of which seems to be to bludgeon the listener into accepting what they conceive to be a "total sound," one which makes their effort more valid than the others around it, and by association, worthy of your reverence.

Denton, TX trio True Widow plays against type. Listen closely to their new double album As High As the Highest Heavens and From the Center to the Circumference of the Earth
and you'll notice something rare: a band that plays to the notions of the genres mentioned above, one which embodies the best characteristics of each but never repeats something that's been done. The understanding of space, balance, and method exhibited by True Widow is different enough to avoid the trappings of genres done to death; special enough to revere, and to pull away from memories of sounds that once wore you down.

Here is a band that has figured out how to play music that is traditionally recognized as "heavy" and "slow," on traditional rock instruments, in a way that few have been able to accomplish: a melancholy, meditative approach to songwriting and soundscape that draws you in. They figured this out in the space of one album, a self-released, self-titled debut from 2008. On As High As the Highest Heavens, they refine the work even further.

Big guitar, bigger drums and the biggest bass (played by D.H., Slim, and Nikki, respectively) effortlessly recreate the unending skies of prairie America, where storms blow across with fury, horizons are unencumbered by the choke of skyscrapers and electric light, and the atmosphere pushes you down. A rumbling backdrop of distortion churns away, both behind and within True Widow's plaintive song structures, but never overpowers it. Across a 50-minute runtime, the nine songs here range from excavated alt-rock anthems ("Night Witches," "Skull Eyes") to methodical epics like "Boaz" and "Blooden Horse," to triumphant bulldozers of sound like "NH," which splits the difference between dirge and hymn, the instruments staring into the ground while D.H. and Nikki's voices ascend to the clouds.

Plenty of you may balk at both the length and largesse expressed in the title of True Widow's new album, but once its powers seep into your skull, you'll likely find it impossible to doubt the magnitude of what's at stake here – a band that is singlehandedly breaking rank from accepted genres, and carving its own path into history.
Venue Information:
Club Dada
2720 Elm St.
Dallas, TX, 75226
http://dadadallas.com/