NSFWknd: WAND, DEAD MEADOW, GIRLPOOL, MERCHANDISE, Creepoid, Zipper Club, Chain of Flowers (uk), Half Waif, Death Valley Girls

Parade of Flesh presents . . .

NSFWknd: WAND, DEAD MEADOW, GIRLPOOL, MERCHANDISE, Creepoid, Zipper Club, Chain of Flowers (uk), Half Waif, Death Valley Girls

Sunday, March 19, 2017

7:00 pm

CLUB DADA & THREE LINKS

Dallas, TX

$18 (Tickets also available at the door)

This event is all ages

WAND
WAND
September 2013, Wand was quietly dismembered and ritually eaten in the hills near Dodger Stadium. Wand reborn as "Wand"— an obese organ falsely organized as 4 overjoyous nerds. Four flesh balloons betting on a few aging amplifiers. I hear they listen to Here Come the Warm Jets on loop all day and plot mail fraud. I hear they stole Dale Crover's car and sacrificed it to the weather near the Los Angeles County Line. Some few things, at least, are certain: Wand hears ghosts. Wand prefers serpents. The Sun is the mother of every fiction. All phenomena will be consumed in alphabetical order, but desire will recirculate ad infinitum. If all else fails, Wand will just devour more hands.
Dead Meadow
Dead Meadow
Dead Meadow formed in 1998 with Jason Simon on vocals and guitar, Steve Kille on bass, and Mark Laughlin on drums. They began to combine 70s hard rock and 60s psychedelic rock with far out and sometimes mystically minded lyrical themes occasionally even hinting at the obscure genius H. P. Lovecraft and other far out writers of the bizarre and weird.[1] The first album, Dead Meadow, was released in 2000 on Tolotta Records, a label run by Fugazi bassist Joe Lally. The LP version was released by Planaria Records. This was quickly followed by 2001's Howls from the Hills, also released on Tolotta Records. At the completion of "Howls from the Hills" John Peel asked Dead Meadow to record a Peel Session which was recorded in Fugazi's home studio, the first time a Peel Session was recorded outside the BBC studios.[1]

In Spring 2002, Laughlin parted ways with the band in order to pursue a career as a lawyer. He was replaced by long-time friend Stephen McCarty ). A live album, Got Live If You Want It, was released in mid-2002, which documented one of the last shows with drummer Mark and was produced by Anton Newcombe of Brian Jonestown Massacre. In early 2003 the band signed with Matador Records and released Shivering King and Others. Along with the heavy song and blues-influenced songs as on the previous two records, the band continued in their psychedelic style, with acoustic elements and ballads. With the addition of second guitarist Cory Shane, Feathers was released in 2005. Simon's guitar virtuosity is influenced by the droning modal character of Eastern music as by classic rock riffs.

Jason Simon is the nephew of The Wire creator David Simon. Dead Meadow's music was used briefly in the episode React Quotes in season five of The Wire.

In 2007 the band has reverted back to a three piece, made an appearance at the 5th annual Green Man Festival in Crickhowell, Wales and relocated from Washington, D.C. to Los Angeles, California.

In the beginning of 2008, Dead Meadow released Old Growth on Matador Records. A collection of songs that brought the band back initially to the same farm that their second release Howls from the Hills was created and eventually finished up at the legendary Sunset Sound studio in Los Angeles. As with the last three albums Old Growth was produced by bassist Steve Kille.

Later in that same year a brief session with Andrew Stockdale of Wolfmother led to the reinterpretation of the Dead Meadow song "Everything's Goin' On" as a new song "Pilgrim" landing on the second release for Wolfmother, "Cosmic Egg".

In March 2010 the band released a feature length live film and soundtrack, "Three Kings", that spotlights their stage show along with psychedelic dream scenarios. The live footage and audio was captured at the bombastic final show of the five month "Old Growth" tour. The film premiered at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles, California[2] and was released on the NYC label Xemu Records, co-run by Kille.

Jason Simon also announced his September release of his first solo "self-titled" acoustic album on TeePee Records.

The song "Sleepy Silver Door" and "Greensky Greenlake" were featured in the skate video "Emerica, Stay Gold."
Girlpool
Girlpool is a Los Angeles based two piece made up of Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad. Having met at local DIY venue the Smell, the two quickly grew very close. Their sound is comprised only of a guitar, bass and vocal harmonies. The band uses this bare bones instrumentation to accentuate their vulnerable yet powerful lyrics to create honest pieces, tackling concepts ranging from awareness and respect to the simple feeling of being alone at a show.
Merchandise
Merchandise
Merchandise have announced details of their new album, A Corpse Wired For Sound, due for release on September 23rd, alongside the video for a second new track, ‘End Of The Week’. Formed nearly a decade ago, galvanized by Tampa hardcore and inspired by its miscreant noise, A Corpse Wired For Sound signals a new chapter for Merchandise.
Following 2014’s After The End — a full-band effort recorded in a closet — the band stripped back to its core of Carson Cox (vocals, electronics), Dave Vassalotti (guitar, electronics) and Pat Brady (bass). The trio travelled to Rosà, Italy for their first ever sessions in a recording studio, La Distilleria, with a local, Maurizio Baggio. The nine-song nocturnal A Corpse Wired For Sound was recorded half in the studio and half at home, in Tampa as well as Cox’s newly adopted bases of New York and Berlin – the culmination of a long-distance collaboration between Cox and Vassalotti.
The album’s metallic title is inspired by a science fiction short story by JG Ballard, but equally sums up the band’s current state of mind. “We were ‘reborn’ as a rock band for After The End,” says Vassalotti, “and then we straight-up died again. It couldn’t last. The result is this distended corpse responding to you from
both sides of the Atlantic, forever singing in spite of everything.” Cox continues further “It’s about the truth of growing up. You can’t take your friends or lovers with you. It’s about finding peace with that loneliness.”
The second song to be aired from A Corpse Wired For Sound, ‘End Of The Week’ is “really about personal reflection and horror,” says Cox, who is responsible for the song’s visuals (he also created the video for lead single ‘Flower Of Sex’). The video is a subliminal homage to Italian film director Michelangelo Antonioni and his motion pictures Blow Up and Zabriskie Point. “The smashed mirror isn’t just a symbol of death,” Cox continues. “It’s the broken image of humanity reflecting back at everyone when they read the news. Reality is an unbearable pill to swallow this year. Somehow the evil people that make up society can still wake up everyday and look at themselves in the mirror.”
A Corpse Wired For Sound will be released digitally and on CD and vinyl on September 23rd via
Creepoid
Creepoid
Creepoid have released two acclaimed albums--HORSE HEAVEN (2010) and CREEPOID (2014)--and two EPs (YELLOW LIVE GIVER and WET). Their much-anticipated third full length CEMETERY HIGHRISE SLUM comes out June 23, 2015 on Collect Records.

Creepoid has shared the stage with Dinosaur Jr., Against Me!, Kurt Vile, Refused, Failure, Swervedriver, ...Trail of Dead, A Place To Bury Strangers, Twin Shadow, Warpaint, Cloud Nothings and Protomartyr, among many others. The band will be touring around North America, the UK and Europe throughout 2015 and into 2016 in support of CEMETERY HIGHRISE SLUM. Visit their website for all upcoming tour dates: www.creepoid.com
Zipper Club
Zipper Club
Zipper Club is comprised of Mason James of Cerebral Ballzy, Lissy Trullie of Lissy Trullie, and Damar Davis on drums. “If it sounds good I don’t care if it’s from the 1920s or the 2016s. As a musician, you take little tidbits of cool sounds you hear and combine them into something completely unique. Music needs to reflect on itself,” says Mason, the no-nonsense guitarist and founding member behind the addictive assault of a new- wave inspired band alongside multi-instrumentalist, co-writer, and vocalist Lissy Trullie.
Such a lack of musical inhibition goes a long way. Mason, a raucous punk-rock kid whose life goals were once to “thrash around onstage and get wildly drunk” with his previous band, Cerebral Ballzy, and Trullie, a successful solo artist coming out of the New York art scene. “At that time in New York,” Trullie says “I was part of a crew of kids who were hell bent on making art and having as much fun as possible”. Incidentally, that period of her life landed her image on the wall at the Whitney Museum as a part of Ryan McGinley’s first solo show. With a shared spirit to embark on the unknown, the two threw caution to the wind and concocted pop music unlike any they’ve made before. “I really respect and love well-written hooks. With Zipper Club, I’m able to be playful and unconstrained albeit still making serious pop music.” Trullie says. “It’s a huge change and not a logical one,” Mason says with a laugh of Zipper Club’s pop missiles, which he began penning two years ago.
At its core, Zipper Club is a union of like-minded musicians who have each navigated the rocky waters of the music industry. The result is a blissful head rush of a band armed with fuzzy guitars, spacey synths and magnetic melodies via their debut single, “Going The Distance.” “It’s music that’s not trying to be something it’s not,” Trullie says of the band’s addictive, brain-lodging sound on its forthcoming debut album, produced by James Iha (Smashing Pumpkins, A Perfect Circle). “Going The Distance” is in many ways a perfect encapsulation of the no-holds-barred attitude of Zipper Club. "It’s a song about constantly moving places but going nowhere," the duo explained. “'Going the
Distance'” is our account of the apathetic feeling arising from a meandering trip.
Mason began writing the songs that formed the backbone of Zipper Club principally out of creative necessity. After touring for several menacing years — “I was falling apart at the time due to too much time on the road” — the remedy was to hole up in his apartment. He began writing songs inspired by the diverse musical tastes of his childhood. He decided he was going to do something new and hook-heavy pop gems quickly sprang to the surface. When out in Los Angeles, in 2014, Mason linked up with Iha with whom he’d previously worked. “He was the only producer I had on my list,” he says of the producer whom the band characterizes as a “subtle mad scientist.” In short, Mason laid down some early songs, brought accomplice Lissy into the fold, together writing the remainder of the record, and solidified what became Zipper Club. For Lissy, Zipper Club marks an invigorating new creative path: no longer carrying the sole weight of a solo project, she’s now found a creative partner to share in the collective musical journey. “I was looking for a breath of fresh air and a new creative outlet,” she says. “And I found it.”
The connection was an undeniable one. “It was instantaneous” says Mason, both musicians are at their core songwriters and storytellers, who recognize an infectious hook when they hear it. They also share similar musical sensibilities: Mason was raised on a steady diet of Motown, while Lissy similarly gravitated towards early R&B and soul due in large part to her record-collecting father. To add to their complimentary musical histories, upon meeting, the duo realized they had both sought out and recorded their last records with David Setik of TV on the Radio. Mason reminisced, “I was like, this is going to be cool. She’s rad!” “My ears perked up as soon as I heard the demos,” Trullie recalls thinking, “Yeah, I definitely want to throw down on this!”
Zipper Club soon hunkered down for additional writing and recording sessions Iha at Eye Sky Studios in North Hollywood. Collaborating with Lissy created “this spark” that Mason could never have foreseen. Additionally, as the pair has subsequently co-written what became the rest of Zipper Club’s debut LP, their musical cohesion has only grown stronger. “It feels like it’s opening up more and more every day,” Trullie says. Adds Mason:. “It’s been super constructive. You’re building a car and the machine starts to work. We are in cruise control and it feels really good.” Mason points to the pummeling, echo-laden “Regrets” — on which Trullie sings, “Talking to you makes me second guess/Living my life with no regrets” — as one of the earliest and most powerful collaborations between he and his new musical counterpart. “A light bulb went off when Lissy sang” says Mason. This was the moment when they realized, “This works!” – and that feeling is what it’s all about.” “At the end of the day,” Trullie says, “It’s about making good music.” By adding Damar Davis on drums, the duo, now a trio, found its final element laminating this notion.
The band aren’t slowing down: they added drummer Damar Davis to the club, put the final touches on their album, and turned heads by going #1 most added on Alternative Radio. It promises to be a busy year. Their multi-sensory live show promises to be every bit as much an endorphin-releasing adrenaline shot as their scorching new songs. “It’s all about trying to come out there with a bang.” Trullie couldn’t agree more: “It’s full-speed ahead.”
Chain of Flowers
Chain of Flowers
Emerging from the murk and dirt of their Cardiff city home, Chain Of Flowers have revealed their long-awaited debut album. Recorded at Monnow Valley Studios in Wales, Chain Of Flowers is a dense eight-track opus of heavy shoegaze sonics and urgent post-punk. The band's razor sharp attention to classic songwriting nous means the record dips and dives between euphoric, hazy melody ('Glimmers Of Joy') and overwhelming gloom ('Bury My Love'), all whilst retaining a breathless pace. Lead track 'Crisis' epitomises this frantic personality exquisitely, skirting between sludgy atmospherics and hardcore's punchy immediacy with aplomb. The six-piece sowed their seeds through the release of six songs over the past three years (via the band's own Swine Language tape label), cutting their teeth on dates alongside Iceage, Cremation Lily, The Fall, The Smear, Shallow Sanction, Eagulls, Nothing and more before decamping to Monnow Valley for the four-day session that spawned their debut LP. "We dropped ourselves into the middle of nowhere and hammered it out with next to no sleep available to us. The urgency and delirium of the situation helped us," explains the band's vocalist Joshua Smith. "Though we only had 96 hours in a studio to physically make it what we wanted, this record is the product of our last three years as a band and beyond that as individuals. We spent a lot of time in our space writing these songs and we've also spent a lot of time ironing them out through playing as and when and wherever we have been able to. "Mixed over six months by New York-based Ben Greenberg (Uniform, The Men, Pygmy Shrews), the LP sees Chain Of Flowers break free of their locality. "It's been a drawn out but very necessary sonic exorcism for us," explains Josh. "We are happy that it will see the light of day."
Half Waif
Half Waif
Half Waif is the project of Nandi Rose Plunkett, based in Brooklyn NY.

In the home of her Indian mother and Irish/Swiss/American father, Nandi grew up listening to a mix of Joni Mitchell, Tori Amos, Celtic songstress Loreena McKennitt, and traditional Indian bhajans. In college, she studied classical singing and became enamored with the inventive works of Olivier Messiaen and Claude Debussy. A lover of synthesizers and pop tunes, her resulting work as Half Waif features richly layered compositions of various origins. Placeless, and yet the product of many places: the imaginative wilds of Northern Massachusetts; Ohio's stark fields; Brooklyn buzzing at night; and ancestral homes across the ocean.
Death Valley Girls
Death Valley Girls
Think of Death Valley Girls as an acid-tripping science experiment that’s been buried alive, and resurrected as a sexually liberated dystopian chain-gang. A cosmic scar, if you will, on the hills of Echo Park, where the experiment began in 2013 by proto-punk Bonnie Bloomgarden and guitarist Larry Schemel — who got lost in the desert, returned to their haunted garage in Echo Park, and pieced together their vision with shopworn images of sexploitation babes, a blood-soaked Iggy Pop, and Bloomgarden’s series of phantasms, the result of spending a year in a mental institution, where she planned her neon-glowing odyssey by listening to Black Sabbath and UFO, reading about alien conspiracy theories, and deriving her band’s moral compass from a line she saw in a movie: “Everybody’s gotta be in a gang,” from campy sexploitation romp Switchblade Sisters (1975). Hometown: Los Angeles, CA
Venue Information:
CLUB DADA & THREE LINKS
Elm Street
Dallas, TX